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Making a Car Key From a Ratcheting Wrench

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Car keys these days are remarkably complex beasts. Covered in buttons and loaded with security transponders, they often cost hundreds of dollars to replace if you’re unlucky enough to lose them. However, back in the day, keys used to just be keys — a hunk of metal in a mechanical pattern to move some levers and open a door. Thus, you could reshape a wrench into a key for an old car if that was something you really wanted to do.

The concept is simple. Take a 12mm ratcheting wrench, and shape the flat section into a profile matching that of a key for an older car without any electronic security features. The first step is to cut down the shaft, before grinding it down to match the thickness and width of the original key.

The profile of the key is then drawn onto the surface, and a Dremel used with a cutting disc to create the requisite shape.  Finally, calipers are used to mark out the channels to allow the key to slide into the keyway, before these are also machined with the rotary tool.

Filing and polishing cleans up the final result to create a shiny, attractive ratchet wrench key. Even better, it does a great job of opening the car, too.

Similar machining techniques can be used to duplicate a key from just a photo (something I did back in 2019 to prank my friend). Alternatively, 3D printing can be great for reproducing even high-security keys. Video after the break.

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wsyedx
38 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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Harvard Law School’s analysis of link rot in the New York Times

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6% of deep links in NYT articles from 2018 are dead, 43% from 2008, and 72% from 1998. #
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wsyedx
140 days ago
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Not that this should be too surprising. Also, news should routinely include and snapshot references anyways.
Hamburg, Germany
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Ptychography Shows Atoms at Amazing Resolution

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Cornell University enhanced electron microscopy using a technique known as ptychography in 2018. At the time, it allowed an electron microscope to resolve things three times smaller than previously possible. But that wasn’t enough. The team has now doubled that resolution by improving on their previous work.

The team says that the images are so precise that the only blurring is due to the thermal motion of the atoms themselves. This could mean that you won’t see a further improvement in resolution in the future.

Ptychography works by scanning material in different overlapping areas and measuring the reflected pattern. By comparing the reflections from overlapping areas, an algorithm can reconstruct what the structure was that created the pattern. The team’s leader, [David Muller], likens it to the speckles laser pointer pet toys make. Paradoxically, the electron beam is slightly defocused to capture more data. After data processing, the resolution is down to a picometer.

Currently, the method is time-consuming and requires large computers, but we all know that computers get faster every year, so in a decade your wristwatch will probably be able to do the number-crunching required. The actual paper is paywalled, but if you have access to the kind of equipment you need to do this, you probably also have access to Science or won’t mind spending a little coin to read the paper. If half of the current resolution is sufficient, you might like reading the older paper, too.

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wsyedx
149 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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Vibrant Dream States Trap Oversized Characters Mid-Slumber in Millo’s Paintings

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“Mare Incognitum” (2021), acrylic on canvas, 27.5 × 27.5 inches. All images © Millo, courtesy of Thinkspace Projects, shared with permission

“Just before the beginning of a new day, there’s a fleeting moment where dreams remain alive,” says Italian muralist and artist Millo (previously) about his new series At the Crack of Dawn. On view through May 22 at Thinkspace Projects in Los Angeles, his acrylic paintings center on oversized subjects who embody the transitional state between deep sleep and waking. The artworks are rendered in Millo’s signature black-and-white, cartoon style and trap the slumbering characters in stark architectural settings. Flashes of color delineate their lulled and curious imaginations, showing a model solar system, sloshing sea, or quiet forest path that capture the “unconscious feelings passed through the haze of the shadow till the glimpse of light, shaping what is silent.”

To see more of Millo’s soothing body of work, check out his site and Instagram. (via Supersonic Art)

 

“Karman Line” (2021), acrylic on canvas, 27.5 × 19.6 inches

“Dusk” (2021), acrylic on canvas, 27.5 × 19.6 inches

“Origin” (2021), acrylic on canvas, 70.8 × 51.1 inches

“Protection” (2021), acrylic on canvas, 39.3 × 47.2 inches

“Memoria” (2021), acrylic on canvas, 31.5 × 31.5 inches

“The Sound of the Waves Collide” (2021), acrylic on canvas, 39.3 × 39.3 inches

“In Reverse II” (2021), acrylic on canvas, 27.5 × 39.3 inches

“Disappear” (2021), acrylic on canvas, 23.6 × 31.5 inches

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wsyedx
149 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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A Map of the Internet 2021

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a map of the Internet 2021

detail of a map of the Internet 2021

Translating sites, search engines, social networks, browsers, ISPs, and other internet entities into geographic features, Martin Vargic has created a map of the internet circa 2021.

It includes several thousand of some of the most popular websites, represented as distinct “countries”, which are grouped together with others of similar type or category, forming dozens of distinct clusters, regions and continents that stretch throughout the map, such as “news sites”, “search engines”, “social networks”, “e-commerce”, “adult entertainment”, “file sharing”, “software companies” and so much more. In the center of it all can be found ISPs and web browsers, which form the core and backbone of the internet as we know it, while the far south is the domain of the mysterious “dark web”.

See also an actual map of the known internet from May 1973.

Tags: infoviz   internet   maps   Martin Vargic   remix
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wsyedx
150 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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This botanical garden’s petal-inspired, hexagonal-laced glass roof brings biodiversity to the city!

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Botanical gardens in big cities always seem to help take us out of the monotonous droll of city living, weaving us through walks of native plant life and educational tours that teach us about plant cultivation and preservation. Bringing a touch of green to Magok, South Korea, Seoul Botanic Garden was designed and built to create an educational and public space that harbors flora and cultural insight from twelve tropic and Mediterranean cities across the globe.

Positioned on the southwestern side of the Han River in the Magok neighborhood of Seoul, the new botanic garden’s location was chosen partly due to the region’s pastoral history. Blossoming a safe distance away from the surrounding marshlands, Seoul Botanic Garden’s rippled, concave roof emulates the formation of a flower’s petals, particularly mimicking the shape of a Rose of Sharon’s petal bed. The 100-m wide concave dish acts as the structure’s roof, shelters the park’s guests, and by resembling the structure of a plant’s petal bed, offers a visually enhanced experience alongside the blooming plant life indoors.

Typically, the roof of a greenhouse takes the form of a convex dome, the roof’s pitch being the highest point inside the structure. However, the delicate rim of Seoul Botanic Garden’s hexagon-laced glass roof remains higher than its indented central point. Inside the greenhouse, plant life from 12 major cities across the globe, including Athens, Greece, and São Paulo, Brazil burst from every sunspot inside the disc-shaped indoor garden. Celebrated as South Korea’s first botanic park built inside a city, Seoul Botanic Garden traverses 500,000 square meters of land, comprising a greenhouse, forest, lake, and wetland.

Designer: Samoo Architects & Engineers

Garbed with a concave roof that mimics a flower’s petal bed, Seoul Botanic Garden uses the roof’s resemblance with nature to evoke a 3D experience for the garden’s guests.

A diamond-dotted skirt wraps the sides of Seoul Botanic Garden to reference the traditional facades found on greenhouses.

Inside, plant life busts at the greenhouse’s seams, covering flora from twelve major cities across the globe, primarily taken from tropical and Mediterranean climates.

Pools of water punctuate the floors of Seoul Botanic Garden, expanding the center’s overall biodiversity.

Inside, sinuous interior design harkens back to the structure of plants.

From an aerial perspective, Seoul Botanic Garden holds an impressive, closed roof that echos the shape of hibiscus flowers native to the country.

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wsyedx
150 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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