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Immense Biomorphic Sculptures Snake from Floor to Ceiling at Hamburger Bahnhof in Eva Fàbregas’ ‘Devouring Lovers’

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A viewer looks up at bulging pink and orange forms that appear to crawl up the industrial hall

All photos by Jacopo La Forgia, courtesy of Eva Fàbregas, National Museums in Berlin, and Hamburger Bahnhof–National Gallery of the Present

Bulbous, biomorphic sculptures in lavender, tangerine, and blush pink rove throughout the airy Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin. The largest solo exhibition to date of Barcelona-born artist Eva Fàbregas, Devouring Lovers brings massive, bulging works to the industrial hall, juxtaposing the cold iron structures with soft, pudgy forms. Inviting in color and grotesque in shape, the organic, monstrous sculptures appear alive, as if they could grow and swallow up the remaining space, viewers and all.

In a recent interview, Fàbregas shares that the interactions between space and the body continually inform her thinking and how she conceptualizes a piece. “It’s about the architecture. It’s about those masses that you put inside the architecture. It’s about the humans moving around the architecture,” she says. “For me, my sculptures are not just themselves, it’s all the things that happen in the same space that affect that installation.”

Devouring Lovers is on view through January 14, 2024. You can find more from Fàbregas on Instagram.

 

Bulging pink and purple forms appear to crawl up the industrial hall and grow across the floor

Bulging pink, purple, and orange forms appear to crawl up the industrial hall and grow across the floor

Bulging pink orms appear to crawl up the industrial hall ceiling

Bulging pink forms appear to crawl up the industrial hall ceiling

Bulging pink and purple forms appear to crawl up the industrial hall and grow across the floor

Bulging pink forms appear to crawl up the industrial hall and grow across the floor

Bulging pink forms appear to crawl up the industrial hall ceiling

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article Immense Biomorphic Sculptures Snake from Floor to Ceiling at Hamburger Bahnhof in Eva Fàbregas’ ‘Devouring Lovers’ appeared first on Colossal.

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wsyedx
365 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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fxer
364 days ago
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Reminder to get your colonoscopy
Bend, Oregon

European satellite strikes lightning

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Lightning over Europe

The first ever satellite instrument capable of continuously detecting lightning across Europe and Africa has now been switched on. New animations from the innovative ‘Lighting Imager’ confirm the instrument will revolutionise the detection and prediction of severe storms.

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wsyedx
382 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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Page Through a 19th-Century Embossed U.S. Atlas Designed with Touchable Cartography for Blind Students

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An open book with raised embossed letters on the left and a raised map on the right

Maine, Atlas of the United States, Printed for the Use of the Blind (1837). All images via David Rumsey Map Associates

About a decade after French educator Louis Braille invented the eponymous system for blind and sight-impaired readers, the New England Institution for Education of the Blind released its own embossed designs allowing those with low or no vision access to important information. Under the leadership of Samuel Gridley Howe, the school, which is now the Perkins School for the Blind, acquired a printing press in 1835 and began to create a variety of learning materials with raised writing for its students. One of those books was an atlas of the United States, which held touchable cartography within its pages.

Paired with descriptions written in standard Latin script—this proved much more difficult to read than braille and never gained the popularity of its counterpart—the maps contain typical information like longitude and latitude, along with the area’s population, climate, and commerce. Solid lines denote rivers, a singular raised shoreline buttressed by parallel lines represents oceans, and clustered triangles are mountains. Printed in 1837 in an edition of 50, this version of the atlas contains just 24 states. Only four copies are known to remain.

Flip through digital scans of the book at David Rumsey Map Associates. (via Kottke)

 

An open book with raised embossed letters on the left and a raised map on the right

New Hampshire

An open book with raised embossed letters on the left and a raised map on the right

Rhode Island

An open book with raised embossed letters on the left and a raised map on the right

Ohio

An open book with raised embossed letters on the left and a raised map on the right

Illinois

An open book with just one side showing with a raised map of Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania

An open book with raised embossed letters on the left and a raised map on the right

New Jersey

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article Page Through a 19th-Century Embossed U.S. Atlas Designed with Touchable Cartography for Blind Students appeared first on Colossal.

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wsyedx
385 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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How iFixit Scores Repairability

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Everyone wants their favorite phone or laptop to get an awesome repairability score. So do we! Unfortunately, we don’t make the rules. Wait a minute—we do make the rules! At iFixit we’ve been wrenching on gadgets of all kinds for two decades, so we’ve developed strong opinions about what makes something easy to fix, or not. The iFixit repairability score, first introduced all the way back in 2011...

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wsyedx
428 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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DOES YOUR FLAG FAIL? Grey Grades The State Flags!

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Thank You, Patreon Executive Producers, For Making This Video Possible.

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wsyedx
438 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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MRI Resolution Progresses From Millimeters to Microns

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Neuroscientists have been mapping and recreating the nervous systems and brains of various animals since the microscope was invented, and have even been able to map out entire brain structures thanks to other imaging techniques with perhaps the most famous example being the 302-neuron brain of a roundworm. Studies like these advanced neuroscience considerably but even better imaging technology is needed to study more advanced neural structures like those found in a mouse or human, and this advanced MRI machine may be just the thing to help gain better understandings of these structures.

A research team led by Duke University developed this new MRI technology using an incredibly powerful 9.4 Tesla magnet and specialized gradient coils, leading to an image resolution an impressive six orders of magnitude higher than a typical MRI. The voxels in the image measure at only 5 microns compared to the millimeter-level resolution available on modern MRI machines, which can reveal microscopic details within brain tissues that were previously unattainable. This breakthrough in MRI resolution has the potential to significantly advance understanding of the neural networks found in humans by first studying neural structures in mice at this unprecedented detail.

The researchers are hopeful that this higher-powered MRI microscope will lead to new insights and translate directly into advancements healthcare, and presuming that it can be replicated, used on humans safely, and becomes affordable, we would expect it to find its way into medical centers as soon as possible. Not only that, but research into neuroscience has plenty of applications outside of healthcare too, like the aforementioned 302-neuron brain of the Caenorhabditis elegans roundworm which has been put to work in various robotics platforms to great effect.

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wsyedx
458 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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